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5.06.2017

george's beer

George Washington brewed his own beer. This should be no surprise. Many farmers and plantation owners brewed their own beers and ales. George Washington had his own recipe.

The handwritten beer recipe




To Make Small Beer
Take a large Sifter full of Bran Hops to your Taste. — Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall. into a cooler put in 3 Gall. Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses into the cooler & Strain the Beer on it while boiling Hot. let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it over with a Blanket & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask — leave the bung open till it is almost don[e] Working — Bottle it that day/Week it was Brewed.

Read More: George Washington’s Personal Beer Recipe Makes an Exclusive Run Through Bent River Brewing Company | http://97x.com/george-washingtons-personal-beer-recipe-makes-an-exclusive-run-through-bent-river-brewing-company/?trackback=tsmclip
 It reads:
Take a large Siffer [Sifter] full of Bran Hops to your Taste.–Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall[ons] into a cooler put in 3 Gall[ons] Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses into the cooler & St[r]ain the Beer on it while boiling Hot. Let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it with a Blank[et] & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask–leave the bung open till it is almost don[e] Working–Bottle it that day Week it was Brewed.

The original copy is in The New York Public Library.

The bulk of the fermentables are derived from molasses, as malted grains are not included in the recipe because they weren’t readily available. Molasses, a byproduct of the sugar refining process, was a very popular brewing ingredient as it was easy to procure, fairly affordable and, most importantly, fermentable.

 The taste? Well, I've never tried it. But I could at the Bent River Brewing Company. They're located in Rock Island, Illinois. They make their own and call it "Old George's Ale".





I'll have to try it sometime and give you a review.

To Make Small Beer
Take a large Sifter full of Bran Hops to your Taste. — Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall. into a cooler put in 3 Gall. Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses into the cooler & Strain the Beer on it while boiling Hot. let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it over with a Blanket & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask — leave the bung open till it is almost don[e] Working — Bottle it that day/Week it was Brewed.

Read More: George Washington’s Personal Beer Recipe Makes an Exclusive Run Through Bent River Brewing Company | http://97x.com/george-washingtons-personal-beer-recipe-makes-an-exclusive-run-through-bent-river-brewing-company/?trackback=tsmclip

Sources: George Washington's Infamous Small Beer Recipe
               An Exclusive Run
               We Tried George's Recipe

To Make Small Beer
Take a large Sifter full of Bran Hops to your Taste. — Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall. into a cooler put in 3 Gall. Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses into the cooler & Strain the Beer on it while boiling Hot. let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it over with a Blanket & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask — leave the bung open till it is almost don[e] Working — Bottle it that day/Week it was Brewed.

Read More: George Washington’s Personal Beer Recipe Makes an Exclusive Run Through Bent River Brewing Company | http://97x.com/george-washingtons-personal-beer-recipe-makes-an-exclusive-run-through-bent-river-brewing-company/?trackback=tsmclip
To Make Small Beer
Take a large Sifter full of Bran Hops to your Taste. — Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall. into a cooler put in 3 Gall. Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses into the cooler & Strain the Beer on it while boiling Hot. let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it over with a Blanket & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask — leave the bung open till it is almost don[e] Working — Bottle it that day/Week it was Brewed.

Read More: George Washington’s Personal Beer Recipe Makes an Exclusive Run Through Bent River Brewing Company | http://97x.com/george-washingtons-personal-beer-recipe-makes-an-exclusive-run-through-bent-river-brewing-company/?trackback=tsmclip

4.08.2017

american revolution overview

Digital History is a remarkable website with information on the American Revolution. It's set up in sections and is well organized. I came across it and wanted to share it with you.

The section I highlight here looks at the causes, fighting, and consequences of the American Revolution. There is information about the emerging patterns of resistance in the colonies, including petitions, pamphlets, intimidation, boycotts, and intercolonial meetings. 

The American Revolution was the first modern revolution. 

People fought for their independence in the name of certain universal principles such as rule of law, constitutional rights, and popular sovereignty. The website examines the causes, fighting, and consequences of the American Revolution. Learn why many colonists hesitated before declaring independence and how the Declaration of Independence summarized colonial grievances and provided a vision of a future.

Here's the link:




4.06.2017

the prison ships: a grisly history

The Revolutionary War seems to not get attention with New York. It should. After all, New York City was the new nation's first capitol. It was also the home of the war's biggest battle.

The Battle of Brooklyn gets that distinction. The battle was a crushing blow to the Colonists in which a major retreat took place as the result. Dense fog covered the area as the colonial forces climbed aboard their boats to safety. The British captured about 1,300 prisoners. After the battle, New York remained in British hands, with several warships always anchored in the East River.

There was a very diabolical situation that gives New York a somber footnote in history. Those are the prison ships that were stationed to house colonial prisoners. About 11,000 prisoners died in these ships during the war. The conditions were terrible as one prisoner noted:

The heat was so intense that [the 300-plus prisoners] were all naked, which also served the well to get rid of vermin, but the sick were eaten up alive. Their sickly countenances, and ghastly looks were truly horrible; some swearing and blaspheming; others crying, praying, and wringing their hands; and stalking about like ghosts; others delirious, raving and storming, all panting for breath; some dead, and corrupting. The air was so foul that at times a lamp could not be kept burning, by reason of which the bodies were not missed until they had been dead ten days. One person alone was admitted on deck at a time, after sunset, which occasioned much filth to run into the hold, and mingle with the bilge water [1]

Every day, corpses were tossed overboard from the hulks—five to ten bodies a day from one ship alone. The remains were moved to a crypt in Fort Greene Park, about a half-mile south of Wallabout Bay. 
 
Prison Ship Martyrs Monument
The 110-year-old Martyrs Monument is a reminder of a time when it was unclear if the United States would survive at all. This monument was dedicated in 1908 and there are plans to incorporate it into the Fort Greene National Park.

              The Battle of Brooklyn


 





3.24.2017

the art of dan nance

Dan Nance paints local, concentrated history.

 His art engages the viewer. With this in mind, I can learn something about the players of the American Revolution. That's really what history is, the engagement of the past with us in the present.

Reading of the Meck Dec by Dan Nance






The above is a painting that tells us much. "Meck Dec" was the nickname for the fabled Mecklenburg Declaration. It was disclosed in May of 1775 at the courthouse in Charlotte, North Carolina. Of course, this predates the Declaration of Independence. The break from Great Britain was not a new notion when the Continental Congress met later in Philadelphia.

Bursting with energy, just like his paintings, Dan Nance uses his talent to relate the tales of colonial North Carolina.

Ambush and artist Dan Nance








Nance allows paint and light to portray another character. This helps us to relive the moment and use our imagination to finish the scene. Dan Nance connects the dots.